Monday, April 11, 2016

So, What's it Going to Be Democrats, Bernie or Hillary? It's Gettin' to be About that Time.....


"Finally, lets understand that when we stand together, we will always win. When men and women stand together for justice, we win. When Black, White, and Hispanic people stand together for justice, we win." - Bernie Sanders

"People can judge me for what I've done, and I think when somebody's out in the public eye, that's what they do. So, I'm fully comfortable with who I am, what I stand for, and what I've always stood for." - Hillary Clinton

        As it stands right now, without counting Supredelegates, the race for the Democratic Party's Presidential nomination is a close one. Hillary Clinton is at 1,287, and Bernie Sanders is at 1,037. So, with only twenty primaries to go in just over three months, there are only 250 delegates separating the two from one another. Further, with Sander's polling numbers surging as the two candidates head into the New York primary, Clinton's lead is beginning to look a bit shallow, and she may find herself in a position similar to that of 2008 when she was defeated by Barack Obama a, then, fairly unknown freshman Senator from Illinois. 



        The mainstream news media would like the American people to believe that this is not the case. They want to act like Clinton has the nomination secured away already, and that Sanders should do the honorable thing and step down. However, just as I have done, if anyone with even a little amount of sense does their research, they will find plenty of evidence that Clinton's campaign is standing on some fairly shaky ground. One can also look to the stress induced response that Clinton and her campaign hands are giving out to people that are seriously questioning her qualifications. She snapped at a member of the environmental lobby, and her husband, former President, Bill Clinton, snapped at a protester from the Black Lives Matter movement.



        If one chooses to read into the quotes that I chose to offer from each candidate, it should be quite clear who I am supporting for the nomination. I am, of course, a Bernie Sanders supporter. I am also pretty sure that a lot of the people that read this blog are also, and for those that are not, I support their right to support whom ever they so choose. That is their democratic right, but the question that I present in the title of this piece is not for we, the common folk. My question is for the leadership of the Democratic Party that seems to find itself in the middle of a tug of war at the moment.



        Just four days ago, amidst Sander's questions about Clinton's qualification for the Presidency, President Obama came out publicly and defended her, saying that "Secretary Clinton comes to this race with more experience than any other non-vice president in recent campaign history." This is, of course, at the same time that Vice President Biden has come out and and supported Sanders, indicating that he likes him and saying about Sanders, "He speaks to a yearning that is deep and real on issues of wealth disparity and people left out of the economy." There is additionally, of course, the split in the DNC. Debbie Wassermann Schultz sits atop the DNC attempting to crown Hillary with the nomination while, around the country, Democratic Party primaries are being saddled with legitimate accusations of voter fraud. This, of course, coincides with cries for her resignation and the departure of her Vice Chair, Tulsi Gabbard, who left, with an explosive amount of controversy, to throw her support to Bernie Sanders.


        So, here we are, three and half months out from the Democratic Party's National Convention in Philadelphia, and the leadership of the party is split on who its nominee for the highest office in the land is going to be. It's not like this has not happened before. It happened eight years when President Obama secured the nomination over Clinton in her first bid for the Presidency, and it has happened many many times before. There is a problem with it happening right now, though. At this very moment, a party, the Republicans, who designed an entire national platform around obstructing the sitting President, the first African American President in our nation's history, is falling apart, as the culmination of their efforts is becoming a reality. They gave rise to the xenophobic, racist, ignorant, uninformed, and reactionary candidate that is Donald Trump, and they gave license to the people he is motivating to express those views also. Just as the Republican Party is falling apart from its own stupidity, the Democratic Party should be coalescing around a candidate that they know can squarely beat such a disreputable human being come November. Instead, they are fighting amongst themselves for the spoils of something, the Democratic Party, which can be said to be just as close to obliteration as the Republican Party presently is.


          The Democratic Party's establishment, with Schultz and Clinton at the head, is in a quandary. They do not want Bernie Sanders to get their Party's nomination. However, the Republican Party's establishment, with McConnell and Ryan at the head, do not want Donald Trump to get their Party's nomination. The Democrats have not made any threats about closing up shop on Sanders, but the Republicans have made such threats against Trump. So, the Establishment factions of both major parties, both of which are neo conservative corpratists, don't want to give the populist wings of their parties access to the game. What on Earth might they do? I contend that out of the ashes of both modern parties, in an effort to secure the interests of their corporate masters, they would join together to form a new, and actually conservative corpratist party, the Conservative Party. This would force both Trump and Sanders to run on their own against a unified and very strong new party. Do you not think that it is possible? If so, consider this; the Republican Party's establishment has already indicated that if Trump get's their party's nomination, they would be willing to break with him and support Hillary. What's to say that Hillary, looking to avoid losing again, won't split from Sanders, and along with the rest of the Democratic Party's leadership, join with McConnell?


        Imagine the prospects of such a combination? The power centers of both modern parties aligning themselves with one another would almost certainly solidify a conservative victory in November. Their answer to my question would obviously be Hillary in this case; but, if that is their answer, what is the answer of those that are left over swimming around in the debris of the collapse of the two traditional parties? I have in the past suggested that the collapse of both major parties would produce a fatal four way of sorts, Civil War, 2016: Is the United States Headed for Another Split? However, as this situation evolves, so does my opinion on what is coming next. I most recently suggested the formation of a new Progressive Party in my piece, Progressive Party 2020: Or Do We Hit the Reset Button? It was either that or start a revolution. Now; consider this possibility, if McConnell and the Republican leadership follow through on their threat to jump ship and support Hillary, the American Left will have to come up with something fairly dramatic to have any chance in hell at beating such a massive alliance. I do believe that I have an idea of what could possibly happen, and I do say very strongly, possibly; but, bare with me, it may seem a little shocking.


        The picture above suggests exactly what it appears to, a merger on the side opposing the new conservative corpratist party of Clinton and McConnell. History tells us that by the middle of the 1990s, both the Democratic and Republican parties had long since left the interests of the average working class American in their rear view mirrors. From that point on, both parties became puppets of America's largest and most powerful corporations. These are the people that both parties have since served; and now, for both parties, it is starting to destroy them. Thus, a union between the leadership of both parties does not really seam all that crazy; in fact, from what we know of their politics, it actually fits quite well. The two people that are shaking up this corpratist monopoly on American politics are Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump. They are just doing it from supposed opposite sides of the spectrum. The truth is that they are not. American politics is becoming in the open, now, what is has always been behind the scenes, a Class Struggle. Both Sanders and Trump are appealing to the working class elements of each party who justifiably feel that they have been brushed to the side of American politics. 
        One might think that such a political union is ludicrous, but think on it. If Clinton and McConnell, and their new Conservative Party, stand as the the ruling class' juggernaut of a party to defend its interests, then the working class of America needs a similar institution. If the American working class has any chance of fighting this new juggernaut, the two people that best represent their interests need to work something out; and more, their positions on substantive issues are not all that different. First, like I said, they are both appealing to the working class elements of the parties, so job retention and fair wages are top on their platforms. Further, on the issues of Immigration, in that it negatively affects jobs and wages, Abortion, and Gun Rights, these two coming from a rural perspective on Bernie's part, the two candidates are not all that dissimilar. The main and most glaring difference rests almost entirely on rhetoric. Bernie, as can be quoted, argues that in order for the working class to achieve any bit of success, it must be united across all boundaries. It must overcome its petty difference and unite under a single banner for the good off everyone, if anyone is to benefit at all. Trump, on the other hand, is appealing the base fears of the predominantly white populace of the socially conservative and extremely racist portion of the American working class. His rhetoric, alone, makes such a union nearly impossible, but if he could quit that heinous and cowardly crap, and pick up, instead, a more inclusive style of rhetoric, a truly working class party could form around he and Sanders. Though, at this point, I, and anyone else reading this, should have some very serious doubts about that.

5 comments:

  1. Why would they stop the process in place to determine what the people want to lead us going forward? Both are white voter candidates.That is their base. Nine million voters have said they want HRC. 2.44 million more than Sanders. He is not leading in delegates nor super delegates despite the online attacks against them. Yet super delegates have never won a primary. He is running out of white states with open primaries. Ranting about the ills in life are both their ammo of Sanders & Trump. Villainizing HRC for their lots in life is also the plans on the Right & Sanders. Because running on what you have accomplished for both would be a short speech and no definite implementation of actual plans keeps attacks by both going. Their campaigns are both attacks on others. For some of us he has gone past progressive to disturbing.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Why would they stop the process in place to determine what the people want to lead us going forward? Both are white voter candidates.That is their base. Nine million voters have said they want HRC. 2.44 million more than Sanders. He is not leading in delegates nor super delegates despite the online attacks against them. Yet super delegates have never won a primary. He is running out of white states with open primaries. Ranting about the ills in life are both their ammo of Sanders & Trump. Villainizing HRC for their lots in life is also the plans on the Right & Sanders. Because running on what you have accomplished for both would be a short speech and no definite implementation of actual plans keeps attacks by both going. Their campaigns are both attacks on others. For some of us he has gone past progressive to disturbing.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Sanders has a very long career in Politics. It is actually much longer than Clinton's. It's just not all at the Federal Level. As for who he is speaking to. I will stand on the argument that he speaks for the Working Class, and he is working to cross all boundaries. Clinton getting the support of African American voters is like Hitler getting the Jewish vote. She and her husband are responsible for the incarceration of hundreds of thousands of African Americans, Latin Americans, and many more. She is a Corporate Interest. She will do what her donors tell her to.

    ReplyDelete